The UNCITRAL Technical Notes on Online Dispute Resolution – Paper Tiger or Game Changer?

By Nadine Lederer, Associate at Hogan Lovells International LLP, Munich, Germany*

Is the future of dispute settlement online? There may not be a more relevant topic for the future of dispute resolution, including arbitration, than Online Dispute Resolution (“ODR”), so it was concluded at the 17th ODR Conference organized by the ICC International Court of Arbitration in Paris in June 2017 (see here).
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The New-Found Emphasis on Institutional Arbitration in India

By Mridul Godha and Kartikey M

Arbitration in India has traditionally skewed towards an ad-hoc rather than an institutional set up. Due to a lack of adequate emphasis on institutional arbitration, Indian parties have preferred to conduct their arbitrations with a seat in Singapore and London. In fact, 153 of the 307 cases administered by the Singapore International Arbitration Centre (SIAC) in 2016 involved Indian parties. India has been plagued by factors like the lack of a credible arbitral institution, excessive judicial intervention, absence of a dedicated arbitration bar and lack of clarity on the concept of public policy, making it an unfavourable place of arbitration.

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Third-party funding in international arbitration: to regulate or not to regulate?

By Rebecca Mulder and Marc Krestin

On 1 September 2017, the ICCA QMUL Task Force on Third-Party Funding published its Draft Report for Public Discussion on Third-Party Funding in International Arbitration. The Task Force has developed principles with the aim of providing guidance to parties, counsel, arbitrators and national courts when facing third-party funding related issues arising in different contexts. Furthermore, and even more notably, the Task Force indicated that the report may be useful for regulatory bodies and arbitral institutions that seek to address issues relating to third-party funding in international arbitration.

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Old Issues, New Horizons: Third-Party Funding in Morocco

By: Othmane Saadani, Attorney at Law, New York State Bar, Associate at Afrique Advisors, Casablanca and Julia Joseph-Louisia, Trainee-Lawyer at the Paris Bar School, Intern at Afrique Advisors, Casablanca  
Third-party funding has become a subject of major discussion over the past few years. It is clear that third-party funding is here to stay, and thus the question today is not whether it is going to grow, but rather where the opportunities are likely to be.

Third-party funding: Definition and objectives

Third-party funding is an arrangement between those who are party (or may be party) to contentious proceedings and funders who undertake to pay the legal costs of the proceedings, in return for a share of the proceeds, in the event the funded party’s claims are successful and result in compensation. Third-party funders will therefore bear the financial risk of potentially unsuccessful claims, insufficient compensation, or even difficulties in enforcement. In addition, this mechanism concerns not only the claimant but also the respondent in the proceedings, which might eventually make well-founded counterclaims. The need for this financial solution increased substantially with the 2008 economic crisis, as seemingly worthy claims lacked funding due to the economic downturn.

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Tips from the Top: Young ICCA interviews Gretta Walters

Gretta Walters is an Associate at Chaffetz Lindsey LLP in New York, where she represents individual and corporate clients in international and cross-border disputes in arbitration and in state and federal court. She has experience in arbitral proceedings under the arbitration rules of the International Court of Arbitration of the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC), the International Centre for Dispute Resolution (ICDR), and the Arbitration Institute of the Stockholm Chamber of Commerce (SCC).  Prior to joining Chaffetz Lindsey, Gretta was an Associate at Mayer Brown, Legal Counsel at the SCC, and a Visiting Lecturer at Stockholm University.

Gretta is a Global Advisory Board member of ICDR Young & International (ICDR Y&I) and Secretary of the International Commercial Disputes Committee of the New York City Bar. She also co-coaches the Foreign Direct Investment and Vis International Commercial Arbitration moot court teams at New York University Law School. She received a J.D. degree from American University, Washington College of Law (Washington, DC) and an LL.M. in international commercial arbitration from Stockholm University (Sweden). She is admitted to the New York bar.

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